Great Lakes Environmental Directory Great Lakes Great Lakes environment Great Lakes grants exotic species water pollution water export drilling environment Great Lakes pollution Superior Michigan Huron Erie Ontario ecology Great Lakes issues wetlands Great Lakes wetlands Great Lakes Great Lakes environment Great Lakes watershed water quality exotic species Great Lakes grants water pollution water export oil gas drilling environment environmental Great Lakes pollution Lake Superior Lake Michigan Lake Huron Lake Erie Lake Ontario Great Lakes ecology Great Lakes issues Great Lakes wetlands Great Lakes Resources Great Lakes activist Great Lakes environmental organizations Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat air pollution alien species threatened rare endangered species ecological Great Lakes information Success Stories Great Lakes Directory Home/News Great Lakes Calendar Great Lakes jobs/volunteering Search Great Lakes Organizations Take Action! Contact Us Resources/Links Great Lakes Issues Great Lakes News Article About Us Networking Services

Great Lakes Article:

Alien Invaders Coming to a Bay Near You
Article courtesy of the Post
Nov. 3, 2001

Aliens, exotics, introductions, invaders...
They can damage native plants, birds, fish, and mammels and disrupt the very natural world we paddle out to enjoy. The good news is that kayakers in particular can help marshal the defenses againest them.

No, it's not the latest summer blockbuster. The sacred haunts of the kayaker are being invaded. This is not the familiar invasion of fellow paddlers (a mixed blessing), but a new and more insidious invasion by other species altogether.
Cruise along the northern Mediterranean coast, and you will find that the shallow sea-grass beds that once teemed with life are now a desert of "killer" green algae, devoid of fish and invertebrates. From British Columbia to California, tranquil estuaries that echoed with flocks of migrating birds are now overgrown with acres of new salt marsh, obscuring the shoreline from birds and boaters alike. Along the volcanic rocky shores of Hawai'i, a new barnacle has taken up residence; the coast of South Africa is being invaded by an aggressive intertidal mussel; New Zealand and Australia are unwilling hosts of new seaweeds. Almost everywhere we paddle, old species are being swapped for new.
But new is not necessarily better.
Aliens, exotics, introductions, invaders…they go by many names, but all of these species share the common trait that they are spreading to places they don't belong. They not only affect kayakers, but snorkelers, scuba divers, fishers, clam diggers, and other boaters. They can carry parasites and diseases. (Some of them are parasites and diseases.) They can damage fisheries, tourism, boating, property values, and industry. They can damage native plants, birds, fish, and mammals and disrupt the very natural world we paddle out to enjoy. That's the bad news. The good news is that kayakers in particular can help marshal the defenses against them.

This information is posted for nonprofit educational purposes, in accordance with U.S. Code Title 17, Chapter 1,Sec. 107 copyright laws.
For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for
purposes of your own that go beyond "fair use," you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


Great Lakes environmental information

Return to Great Lakes Directory Home/ Site Map